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The Tragic Reason Tamron Hall Painted a Fingernail Purple to End Domestic Abuse

The tragic reason Tamron Hall painted a fingernail purple to end domestic abuse.

Upworthy
By Robbie Couch
September 23, 2016

Excerpt Below:

As you can imagine, the loss [of Tamron’s sister] was devastating to Hall, a co-anchor on the “Today” show. She was forever changed.

In 2004, Tamron Hall’s sister, Renate, was found beaten to death in the backyard of her Houston, Texas, home. She’d had a history of relationships with abusive men. As you can imagine, the loss was devastating to Hall, a co-anchor on the “Today” show.

She was forever changed. “No one deserves what happened to my sister, ” Hall told People magazine in April 2016. “For a long time I was hesitant about sharing our story. I didn’t want to be another well-known person saying, ‘Look what happened to me and my family.’ But then I said, ‘Screw that. I can save a life.’

That’s why Hall is sporting one purple-painted nail on her left hand.

New profile pic. Watch tomorrow #todaystake as we #putthenailinit @safehorizon 9et for more …

A photo posted by Tamron Hall (@tamronhall) on

Hall stars in a new PSA for Safe Horizon’s #PutTheNailInIt campaign aimed at ending domestic violence.

The PSA by Safe Horizon — a nonprofit aimed at empowering the survivors of and preventing domestic abuse — encourages viewers to paint their left ring-finger nail purple (the color of the anti-domestic violence movement) in a show of solidarity.

The campaign has been an ongoing initiative for the group, but Hall’s latest PSA is bringing renewed interest to efforts to #PutTheNailInIt just days before the start of October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Domestic abuse is a topic that gets attention but not nearly enough.

1 in 4 adult women and 1 in 7 adult men will experience violence at the hands of an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime.

Those stats are alarming enough, but the prevalence of domestic abuse across the U.S. is even more sobering when you dissect the numbers behind the groups that affected even more.

Read the original article here.